Free Market Fairness

October 4, 2019 - Comment

Can libertarians care about social justice? In Free Market Fairness, John Tomasi argues that they can and should. Drawing simultaneously on moral insights from defenders of economic liberty such as F. A. Hayek and advocates of social justice such as John Rawls, Tomasi presents a new theory of liberal justice. This theory, free market fairness,

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Can libertarians care about social justice? In Free Market Fairness, John Tomasi argues that they can and should. Drawing simultaneously on moral insights from defenders of economic liberty such as F. A. Hayek and advocates of social justice such as John Rawls, Tomasi presents a new theory of liberal justice. This theory, free market fairness, is committed to both limited government and the material betterment of the poor. Unlike traditional libertarians, Tomasi argues that property rights are best defended not in terms of self-ownership or economic efficiency but as requirements of democratic legitimacy. At the same time, he encourages egalitarians concerned about social justice to listen more sympathetically to the claims ordinary citizens make about the importance of private economic liberty in their daily lives. In place of the familiar social democratic interpretations of social justice, Tomasi offers a “market democratic” conception of social justice: free market fairness. Tomasi argues that free market fairness, with its twin commitment to economic liberty and a fair distribution of goods and opportunities, is a morally superior account of liberal justice. Free market fairness is also a distinctively American ideal. It extends the notion, prominent in America’s founding period, that protection of property and promotion of real opportunity are indivisible goals. Indeed, according to Tomasi, free market fairness is social justice, American style.

Provocative and vigorously argued, Free Market Fairness offers a bold new way of thinking about politics, economics, and justice–one that will challenge readers on both the left and right.

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Comments

Anonymous says:

Rawlsian Libertarianism When Tomasi’s book first came in 2012, it got a lot of attention in libertarian circles. He challenged a lot of preconceived notions about libertarianism, fairness, and justice. Tomasi sets out in this book to create a kind of hybrid between the commitments typically associated with libertarians (and/or classical liberalism, market liberalism, etc.) and the commitments normally tied to what he calls High Liberalism (welfare liberalism, modern liberalism, egalitarian liberalism, etc.)…

Anonymous says:

Bridging Rawls and Hayek This is a work of political philosophy that attempts to bridge the divide between what the author defines as the “classical liberalism” of F.A. Hayek, Richard Epstein, Adam Smith, and Milton Friedman with the “high liberalism” of John Rawls. First the author briefly describes the two camps, the main difference being that “classical liberalism” includes a robust set of economic freedoms as among the fundamental rights. Then the author outlines his own concept — not fully developed, but more of…

Anonymous says:

Tomasi argues that such a regime of “market democracy” can satisfy John Rawls’s difference principle Free Market Fairness is simply an outstanding book, worthy of all five stars.The book starts with a discussion of the history of liberal thought and its three main strands of classical liberalism, libertarianism, and high liberalism (which I would prefer to call progressivism, but whatever). This history alone is worth reading. It’s remarkably fair and charitable to all sides, and it sets the syncretic stage for the rest of the book.Tomasi’s basic idea is simple…

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